Author Archives: E. J. Bantz

Attending 2016 Midwest Dreamin Conference

This will be my second year attending the Salesforce conference in Chicago.

http://midwestdreamin.com/

I like this one because it is lead by user groups instead of directly by Salesforce.   The conference has a much different feel from the typical ones.   They are more focused on admins, developers, and users, and are less of a marketing pitch.

It’s a really great place to meet people that are into Salesforce and to trade tips.

If you are attending please reach out to me so we can meet there.

E. J.

 

1.75mm Reprap Home Made Hot End Design V2

Parts:hotend_v2

  • 1/2 inch teflon rod
  • ID 1.8mm, OD 2.3mm teflon tube
  • ID 2.0mm, OD 4.0mm teflon tube
  • 5/8 square aluminum block
  • 5/16 inch, 18 threads per inch, brass rod
  • 5/16 inch, 18 threads per inch, brass acorn/cap nut
  • 2.5 x 1.15 x 3/4 inch wood block

Tools:

  • Size #77 drill bit (for nozzle tip)
  • 3/32 drill  bit (for thermistors)
  • 5/16 bottoming tap bit
  • F drill bit (or 1/4″, for 5/16 tap)
  • #6-32 tap bit
  • #36 drill bit (or 7/64″,  for #6-32 tap)
  • 5/ 32 drill bit (for 4mm teflon hole)

Teflon Rod

The rod acts as a heat buffer between the hot aluminum block and the extruder body.   Use the 5/32 drill bit core out a hole down the center.   Drill half way through one end.  Flip the rod and drill the other half from the other end of the rod.    You do this because getting a hole straight through can be tricky without a lathe.    This hole needs to be just big enough to thread the bendy 4mm Teflon tube through it.

Aluminum Block

Start with a stock 5/8 x 5/8 bar of aluminum and cut to length.  Drill a 5/32 hole all the way through the middle.   Then follow that hole with a F (or 1/4″) drill bit just half way through.    Tap the hole with 5/16-18 threads.   Drill two #36 holes for mounting screws.   Drill two 1/4 holes for the power resistors.   Drill two 3/32 holes for the thermistors.

The bottoming tap bit, vs a taper, will give you more threads in the hole and get them closer to the bottom.

To cut a length from the bar, use a circular saw with metal cutting blade (small teeth).   Put some oil on the blade and aluminum to help the chips come free.    Or you can also use a hack saw by hand if you are doing just one.   If you don’t have a blade for cutting metal, you can use one for wood, but go really slowly so the bar doesn’t get jammed in there.

Brass Rod

Drill 5/32 hole through the rod, halfway from each side to minimize stray from the drill bit wandering.    This piece should screw into the aluminum block and should allow Teflon tube to go all the way from the Teflon rod to the tip.   Since the tapped threads in the block will be tapered a bit, you can also taper the brass rod a little to let you screw it in more.   Any gap in between the brass rod and the 5/32 hole in the block will let the teflon tube expand when under pressure and could pop a leak.   So it’s best to taper enough so the end of the brass actually touches the block.  Also taper the other end so the nut cap can fit on more.

Brass Nut

Drill #79 hole from the inside out if possible.   The drill bit will self center if the nut cap has a divot on the inside.    Otherwise, you can put the nut in a vice and come at it from the outside.      Spin the nut in a drill press to remove some of the material around the hole to reduce drag and heat transfer with plastic already deposited.

3D Printer Camp May 2014

In my spare time, I like to help people build 3d printers.

My next big group build will be in May, but registration for the event ends next week.

If you have plans to build your own 3d printer this year, this is an opportunity for you to save money on the parts and get some help putting them all together.

http://3dprintercamp.com

Have fun!

 

Leaking Hot End

Here is why you don’t want to use a thin Teflon tube in your hot end.     The pressure will build up and pop a hole in the tube.    The PTFE in this hot end was 1.8mm and OD 2.3mm which is only .25 wall thickness.    It ran alright for a few hours and then started oozing plastic out every where.    This weekend I will modify it to use a ID 2mm and OD 4mm tubing.   I’d like to have an inner diameter of 1.8, but I just can’t find it anywhere with a decent wall thickness.

image

 

Reprap Home Made Hot End Design

This is still a rough draft and changes will be made. HotEnd

Parts:

  • 1/2 inch teflon rod
  • ID 1.8mm, OD 2.3mm teflon, teflon tube
  • 1/2 square aluminum block
  • 5/16 inch, 18 threads per inch, brass rod
  • 5/16 inch, 18 threads per inch, brass acorn/cap nut

Tools:

  • Size #79 drill bit
  • 3/32 drill  bit
  • 5/16 bottoming tap bit
  • 17/64 drill bit (or F size)
  • 11/64 drill bit
  • 5/ 32 drill bit

Teflon Rod

The rod acts as a heat buffer between the hot aluminum block and the extruder body.   Use the 3/32 drill bit core out a hole down the center.   Drill half way through one end.  Flip the rod and drill the other half from the other end of the rod.    You do this because getting a hole straight through can be tricky without a lathe.    This hole needs to be just big enough to thread the bendy Teflon tube through it.

Aluminum Block

Start with a stock 1/2 x 1/2 bar of aluminum.   Drill a 3/32 hole all the way through.   Then follow that hole with a 7/64 drill bit just half way through.    Tap the hole with 5/16-18 threads.    Then drill holes for the resistor, screws, and thermistor.   Drill two 11/64 holes for mounting screws.   Drill 5/32 hole for the power resistor.

The bottoming tap bit, vs a taper, will give you more threads in the hole and get them closer to the bottom.

To cut a length from the bar, use a circular saw with carbide tipped blade.   Put some oil on the blade and aluminum to help the chips come free.    Or you can also use a hack saw by hand if you are doing just one.

Brass Rod

Drill 3/32 hole through the rod, halfway from each side to minimize stray from the drill bit wandering.    This piece should screw into the aluminum block and should allow Teflon tube to go all the way from the Teflon rod to the tip.   Since the tapped threads in the block will be tapered a bit, you can also taper the brass rod a little to let you screw it in more.   Any gap in between the brass rod and the 3/32 hole in the block will let the teflon tube expand when under pressure and could pop a leak.   So it’s best to taper enough so the end of the brass actually touches the block.

Brass Nut

Drill #79 hole from the inside out.   The drill bit will self center.

Thumbnail pictures when sharing to LinkedIn and Facebook

The Problem

Sometime when you share a link on LinkedIn, it gives you something add for the choice of pictures to display to the left of the article.   That this job posting for example:

Capture

 The Background

LinkedIn and Facebook using Open Graph to decide which photos to use.   Open Graph lets web pages become meaningful objects that make it easy for other things to consume it.

A page implements Open Graph by adding a bunch of html tags in the header.   For example:

<meta property=”og:image” content=”http://ejbantz.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/xend.png” />

 With the og:image meta tag there, LinkedIn now knows which image is appropriate for the page.

Capture2

LinkenIn still has some additional requirements that the image needs to meet in order to qualify to be displayed, like it needs to be at least 80×150 pixels.   Details can be found here:

https://developer.linkedin.com/documents/setting-display-tags-shares

More information about Open Graph can be found here:

http://ogp.me

 So if the page you are sharing does not have the images you would expect to see, check the page source to see if it has the og:image meta tags.

Custom Mendel90 X Ends with Zip Tie holes

The reprap Mendel90 is a great design, but there are a few things I wanted to change.  I’m in the process of building 12 of them and really need to stream line the assembly.

This post will cover the X-Ends that hold the motor, idler, and smooth rods.

  • The 45 degree wall with holes.
    • I found this to be difficult to print reliably.
    • Changed the holes to be tiny dimples.   You can see where the center of the hole should be and then just drill them out.
  • Walls wrap around the LM8UU linear bearings.
    • The build guide recommends to heat the part with a blow dryer to soften it, and then force them in.   This was pretty painful to do and does not work well when building many printers.   It doesn’t look good at all.
    • Removed the walls and added holes for tie straps.
    • Also added a bit more vertical space for the bearings.

The part also has some walls that used to mount ribbon cables and such.   I’m not using those in my build so I removed them to save on print time and questions about what they are for.

You can download the parts here:
http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:185704

For more information about the group build we are doing visit this site:
http://www.centare.com/3dprinter

Pledge November

PledgeNovember.com was put together by my friend David Manske. It’s first year they raised over $1,800 for men’s cancer.  

Participants create an account and then post daily photos of the growth of their facial hair.

This was the first time I had grown out a beard.   It was a lot of fun

Check out my progression on the website. and was for a great cause.

EJ Bantz with a beard

 

3D Printer Camp 2013

I’m coordinating a group build of 3D Printers.

Participants pay $415 up front.  On the day of the event you receive all the parts, get help building the printer, and go home with a working 3D printer.   

The style of the printer is Mendel90.   But we are not strictly following their plan.   I’ve customized many of the parts, and skipped some of the things that I did not like.   For example, we aren’t going to use any those ribbon cables, and we are just going to hot glue the limit switches in place.

Here’s link to the event.